Health – Flu/Diseases

 

Seasonal and Flu Information:

As new information is received from the National Center for Disease Control and from our Massachusetts Department of Public Health, we will post announcement on our web site, QuincyPublicSchools.com. We have also included a link below to the City of Quincy Health Department which has additional information about the seasonal flu.

The Quincy Public Schools in conjunction with the Quincy Health Department will be offering free vaccinations to our Middle and High School students. Parents who wish to have their children vaccinated will need to complete, sign and return a consent form. Please watch for announcements on our web site, QuincyPublicSchools.com

Additional Information About the Flu:

Contagious Diseases:

As nurses we are often asked about the school policy on many different types of childhood infections. Below you will find a general list of the most frequently seen childhood illnesses. This is just a guide and specific questions or concerns should be directed to your health care provider.

Conjunctivitis– this can be bacterial, viral, or caused by allergies. If diagnosed to be caused by bacteria, your child must be excluded from school until he/she has been on the appropriate medication for at least 24 hours.

Chicken Pox– most children have either been immunized or have had the disease but we are seeing many children being re-infected. If your child is diagnosed with chicken pox they must remain out of school until all of the lesions have crusted over. All cases of chickenpox must be reported to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

Fever- If your child is feeling ill and running a temperature over 100 degrees they should be kept home from school.

Fifth Disease- A viral infection that is usually mild and many times goes undiagnosed. It is spread by cough or sneeze. A fever may or may not be present and a rash may appear on the cheeks giving the appearance of slapped cheeks. Rash may also present on the body. There is no treatment for Fifth Disease and the child is usually not contagious once symptoms do appear. Although rare, Fifth Disease can be potentially harmful to pregnant women and a developing fetus. Please inform the school nurse if your child is diagnosed with Fifth Disease so that staff may be notified if warranted.

Impetigo- This skin infection is caused by bacteria. Lesions are blister like in appearance. It is spread by direct contact with a lesion. Student should be excluded from school for at least 24 hours after beginning antibiotic treatment prescribed by their health care provider.

Head Lice – Quincy Public Schools have a no nit policy which means that students found to have lice and/or nits will be dismissed from school and not be allowed to return to school until the school nurse has determined they are free of lice and knits. Click here to view an informational brochure for parents.

Nausea, Vomiting, and or Diarrhea- If your child has a stomach illness that is causing any of these symptoms please keep them home from school until they have not had an episode for at least 24 hours.

Pertussis- Also known as whooping cough, is a disease caused by bacteria and is easily spread from person to person by coughing, sneezing or talking. It begins with cold symptoms and progresses to a sometime uncontrollable cough that may sound like a whooping noise and may lead to vomiting. It is most common in Massachusetts in 10-20 year olds who do not have the protection any longer from the childhood vaccine. Vaccine with Pertussis is now available for older children and adults and can prevent the disease. Anyone exposed to the disease should see their health care provider and may be excluded from school.

Strep Throat- This is a sore throat caused by a bacteria. Symptoms may include fever, stomachache, headache, vomiting. Scarlet fever, a complication of strep throat may present as a fine red rash on the chest and back. Both conditions need to be treated with an antibiotic after being evaluated by a health care professional. Student should be excluded from school for at least 24 hours after beginning treatment.