Recommended Websites

 

Scratch – An MIT Media Lab Animation Project

“With Scratch, you can program your own interactive stories, games, and animations — and share your creations with others in the online community. Scratch helps young people learn to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively — essential skills for life in the 21st century. Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. It is provided free of charge.” Create an account to save your creations and join in the fun. Download if you want to work offline or create in the cloud.

 

 

Khan Academy – Online Learning for Everyone

“A free world-class education for anyone anywhere. Khan Academy is an organization on a mission. We’re a not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education for anyone anywhere. All of the site’s resources are available to anyone. It doesn’t matter if you are a student, teacher, home-schooler, principal, adult returning to the classroom after 20 years, or a friendly alien just trying to get a leg up in earthly biology. Khan Academy’s materials and resources are available to you completely free of charge.”

 

National Geographic

“The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888. It is one of the largest nonprofit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, and the promotion of environmental and historical conservation.”

 

OWL Online Writing Lab – Perdue University

“Launching the World’s First Online Writing Lab in 1994. In an attempt to bring the Purdue Writing Lab to students no matter where they were, Dr. Muriel Harris (former director and founder of the Purdue Writing Lab) and David Taylor (former graduate student in Educational Computing) started the world’s first Online Writing Lab (OWL) in 1994…Since that time, our OWL has become a complement to classroom instruction, a supplement to face-to-face tutorials, and a stand-alone reference for thousands of writers worldwide.”

 

Great Websites for Kids – American Library Association 

“Great Websites for Kids is a compilation of exemplary websites geared to children from birth to age 14. Suggested sites are evaluated by the Great Websites for Kids Committee using established selection criteria. The committee is made up of members of the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.”

 

Bartleby – Great Quotes and Books Online

“Bartleby.com began as a personal research experiment in 1993 and within one year published the first classic book on the Web (Whitman’s Leaves of Grass). It was inconceivable then that a billion page views was possible, let alone, hundreds of millions of users…(Bartleby’s is) proud to have shepherded our mission over the last two decades to serve both the academic community and the curious reader, especially continuing the development of our original offerings: quotations and poetry anthologies.

 

Book Awards by YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association)

“Looking for great teen books? Look no further than Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) Book Awards and Selected Booklists. While these books have been selected for teens from 12 to 18 years of age, the award-winning titles and the titles on YALSA’s selected lists span a broad range of reading and maturity levels. We encourage adults to take an active role in helping individual teens choose those books that are the best fit for them and their families.”

 

Mass Moments – Great History of Massachusetts

“The Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities (Mass Humanities) launched the Mass Moments project—an electronic almanac of Massachusetts history—on January 1, 2005…Visitors to the Mass Moments website can choose to listen to a one-minute audio spot or read the script, and then explore the story further by reading a background essay and clicking on a primary source document, links to follow, and places to visit. You can also use the timeline to see when a given “moment” occurred and a map to see where it happened.”

 

InfoPlease – online research and information

“Information Please has been providing authoritative answers to all kinds of factual questions since 1938—first as a popular radio quiz show, then starting in 1947 as an annual almanac, and since 1998 on the Internet at www.infoplease.com. Many things have changed since 1938, but not our dedication to providing reliable information, in a way that engages and entertains.”

 

Awesome Library 

“In 1995, Dr. R. Jerry Adams began developing an Internet library database… In 1996 a second federal program sponsored a Web interface under the name of “Library-in-the-Sky” so that the public could continue to gain access. In May of 1997, the Evaluation and Development Insitute (EDI) began offering the database through the Web portal “Awesome Library.”

 

Cybersleuth Kids

Cybersleuth Kids is dedicated to internet resources, printable educational (and fun) worksheets, games, videos, and pictures. Great source for clip art, too! Fun facts on everything from art and music to math and science. Lots of information on fun subjects such as sports and games.

 

 

Internet Public Library – Kid’s Space

“ipl2 is a public service organization and a learning/teaching environment. To date, thousands of students and volunteer library and information science professionals have been involved in answering reference questions…and in designing, building, creating and maintaining the ipl2’s collections… In January 2010, the website “ipl2: information you can trust” was launched, merging the collections of resources from the Internet Public Library (IPL) and the Librarians’ Internet Index (LII) websites. The site is hosted by Drexel University’s College of Information Science & Technology, and a consortium of colleges and universities with programs in information science are involved in developing and maintaining the ipl2.”

 

 

Kids.gov

“Brought to you by USA.gov, Kids.gov is the official kids’ portal for the U.S. government. We link kids, parents and teachers to U.S. government information and services on the web from government agencies, schools, and educational organizations, all geared to the learning level and interest of kids.Kids.gov is organized into three audiences: Grades K-5, Grades 6-8, and Educators. Each audience tab is divided into educational subjects like Arts, Math, and History. Within each subject, the websites are grouped as either government sites (Federal, state, military) or other resources (commercial, non-profit, educational). The sites listed under the other resources category are maintained by other public and private organizations.”

 

 

Discovery Kids

Discovery Kids is organized around games, puzzles, tell me, activities, and quizzes. Within each area, kids can explore different topics such as nature, science, and fun facts. A lot of animation and graphics keep the site lively and engaging.

 

 

Fact Monster

Fact Monster is by Pearson, the same company that created InfoPlease. Information is organized by topic such as World, Science, and Homework Center, with lots of graphics. Easy to use and kid-friendly. Also includes a Reference Desk with dictionary, encyclopedia, atlas, and more.

 

Kids Click

KidsClick is a kid-friendly search service. Users can search in a variety of ways including keyword, category, or alphabet. Kids can also search media such as audio, video, and pictures. What sets KidsClick apart is the ability to search by Dewey Decimal system – the same way boos are organized in a library. “KidsClick is owned and run by the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at Kent State University.Our web site is located at: http://slis.kent.edu

 

Free Rice – Get smarter and help end hunger in the world

“Freerice is a non-profit website that is owned by and supports the United Nations World Food ProgrammeFreerice has two goals: Provide education to everyone for free (and) help end world hunger by providing rice to hungry people for free. For each answer you get right, we donate 10 grains of rice through the World Food Programme to help end hunger.”