Early Education and Care

 

Early childhood student working with childrenEarly Education and Care is part of the Health Care Technology career major. Students in the Health Care Technology major take an introductory course, focusing on the personal and community level. Early Education and Care courses are designed as interactive, hands-on experiences, where students learn in the classroom and practice at outside placements in real early childhood classrooms. Students prepare portfolios starting Junior year which include pre-clinical checklists for placement, evaluations, competency-based frameworks check lists, writing samples, and their philosophy of education. Training in the growth and development of children from birth to seven and child psychology is put to practical use. Students observe and assist in the placement classroom setting. Students in the Early Education and Care program at Quincy High School may become a preschool teacher upon graduation and a lead teacher at the age of twenty-one.

What can you do with your Early Education and Care career training?

Early childhood workers care for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. They may also supervise older children before and after school. Workers foster learning through play.

Training you need:

Students must be in the Early Education and Care major for two years to be eligible for licensing by the Department of Education, Early Education and Care Qualifications Unit. Juniors must complete 350 hours and Seniors must complete 400 hours of academics, theory, and clinical placement. Child Development Associates (CDAs) must have a two year associate’s degree, as recommended by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

Where you can work:

About 35% of child care workers have private in-home care businesses, 18% are employed in child-care services, 20% work for private households. The remainder work in civic and social organizations.

What you can earn:

Average earnings are $14,790-$21,930.

Career outlook:

Job growth is predicted to be 18% over the next 10 years. High turnover means that jobs are readily available. New regulations mean additional training and certifications. Many child care centers are adding Infant/Toddler rooms and private kindergarten classes. Many public school systems offer integrated preschools as a placement choice.

Equipment/software you will learn to use:

Texts, student workbooks, full year binders, journals, lesson plan books, and hands-on gross and fine motor activities.

Certifications or Licenses You May Earn While in High School:

  • Early Education and Care License (High School Diploma)
  • Adult, Infant, and Child CPR
  • AED (Automated External Defibrillator)
  • Pediatric First Aid
  • Early Education and Care Program Certificate

What kind of job can you get with this training?

Preschool teacher, lead teacher (after 2 years teaching experience), or nanny.

With additional training/education, what jobs are available?

Director, associate director, public or private school teacher, instructor, curriculum developer, or education consultant.

What you should know…

Students who enroll in this program may become teachers. The program can be a stepping stone for many other careers, helping students understand themselves, what teaching involves, and current issues and problems that teachers see and deal with on a daily basis.

Recommended Course of Study

Grade 9

English
Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Physical Education
Pathways
1 Elective Course

Grade 10

English
Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Physical Education
Health/Human Services Introduction
1 Elective Course

Grade 11

English
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Physical Education
Early Education and Care 1
1 Elective Course

Grade 12

English
Social Studies
Physical Education
Early Education and Care 2
2 Elective Courses

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