Broadcasting Technology

 

Broadcasting Career training provides a broad-based preparation for students. Broadcasting Technology 1 students learn all of the positions and equipment on a studio show including director, producer, news, technical and management, Students also use portable video equipment for location shoots. Broadcasting Technology 2 students write a screenplay, shoot and edit a movie which students direct, film, record, and act. They complete a series of projects including a music video, a commercial, Internet podcast, sports announcers, animation, and interviews. Broadcasting Technology 3 students produce the morning announcements, a daily live show that is broadcast to the entire city of Quincy.

What can you do with your Broadcasting Technology career training?

The switch to digital broadcasting means changes in both technical and on-air broadcasting. The broadcasting industry consists of television and radio, but newer media such as cable and the Internet also provide content. Broadcasting careers fall into one of five broad areas.

Production includes directors, producers, and video editors. News includes reporters, anchors, and news directors. Technical careers include camera operators, control engineers, and technical directors. Sales include both sales and marketing. Management
oversees and manages personnel.

Training you need:

Even entry-level jobs generally require a college degree or a 1-, 2-, or 4-year technical training program. Most employers expect employees to immediately perform tasks and provide limited on-the-job training.

Where you can work:

Thirty-nine percent of broadcast employees work in television, 34% work in radio, and 27% work in cable. Generally, broadcast employees begin in smaller markets or at smaller stations in larger markets.

What you can earn:

Broadcasting careers average between $32,360 for technical jobs to $47,560 for production careers. Employees in larger metropolitan areas have higher wages.

Career outlook:

Competition for jobs is very intense, especially in larger, better-paying markets. Job growth is expected to be 9% over the next 10 years. Experience, advanced training and computer skills are needed to advance. The planned opening of movie studios in Massachusetts will improve career outlook.

Equipment/software you will learn to use:

Broadcasting students learn to use a wide variety of state-of-the-art equipment including an Echolab MVS-5 Switcher, a Mackie 1642-VLZ Pro Audio Mixer, and three JVC GY-DV550 Cameras. Our location equipment includes four Sony DVcam camcorders. Students learn to digitally edit on both PC and Mac computers using industry-leading software such as Adobe Premiere and Final Cut Pro as editing software.

What kind of job can you get with this training?

Students have gone into business videotaping weddings or are employed at local cable TV stations. One former student does voice-overs for cartoons and commercials. Another former student holds a microphone on the field at Patriots games. Other jobs include game show producer, production assistant at Channel 7, and studio manager at Boston University.

With additional training/education, what jobs are available?

Audio engineer, 3-D animator, sound production for music or movies, cinematographer, cameraman, news anchor, field reporter, on-air radio DJ, station manager, advertising sales rep, computer animation, screenwriter, director, or producer.

Recommended Course of Study

Grade 9

English
Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Physical Education
Pathways
1 Elective Course

Grade 10

English
Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Physical Education
Broadcasting Technology 1
1 Elective Course

Grade 11

English
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Physical Education
Broadcasting Technology 2
1 Elective Course

Grade 12

English
Social Studies
Physical Education
Broadcasting Technology 3
3 Elective Courses

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